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Friday, October 31, 2008

Food Network Has Full TV Show Video's Online Now

I read this on foodaddict and was glad to see it! Food Network now is featuring some of it's cooking shows online in video's. You can watch them at food network or you can use the video bar on this site to watch them. Finally full length programs on your computer that I'd be interested in watching.



One of the choices is Cooking For Real with Sunny Andersen and the other is Diners,Drive Ins & Dives. Have fun!


We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Free Diabetes Cookbook you can ask for

Get your free diabetes cookbook at the this link. Afterall, nothing is better than free.


We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Thursday, October 30, 2008

Vegetable Soup was a Flop, Diabetic Memory To Blame?

Tonight's dinner was not very good. It wasn't anyone's fault but my tried and true Vegetable Soup I'd made many times before did not turn out great like it usually does. The only thing I changed was using frozen bag of peas instead of a can of peas but I don't understand how that could have been the problem.

It tasted watery and the juices kept puddling to the center of the bowl. I don't know what the problem was. But at least my testing number was still very good. It was 125 so all in all a good meal for that.



I've been making this same soup for years and even though I wrote the recipe for it into my notebook it tasted "off". For one thing I had not written down that chili flakes red pepper, was even an ingredient and I know it was. So I started by putting a 1/2 tsp. of it in and rechecking it every half hour. So after an hour and a half it had a total of 1+1/2 tsp. of the red flakes. It did have the light peppery taste but it was just off. I hate that diabetes is working on my meory and I have to resort to reading a recipe to cook! And I especially hate it when I can't get a recipe right anymore especially one I've been making for over 30 years!


Does anyone else have this problem making meals anymore?




Dinner Menu:



Vegetable Soup 1 cup

16 tiny wheat crackers

1 orange

1 slice sugar free angel food cake

1 tbsp sugar free cool whip topping










We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Make the Switch to Whole Wheat Foods & Recipes










Make the Switch to Whole Wheat

By Hillary Marshak



If you could make a simple change in your diet that would reap
enormous health benefits, would you do it? Then why not switch
to whole wheat?




Fortunately in this day in age, the choice between whole wheat
and regular products is popping up everywhere. Not just in the
restaurants I’ve mentioned above but in grocery stores too.
Replace your regular pasta with whole wheat pasta, or your pizza
crust with whole wheat pizza crust. The possibilities are
endless, as anything that's made with flour can be made with
whole wheat flour instead.
The Nutritional Benefits




The benefits of consuming whole wheat grains versus processed
grains are innumerable. Whole wheat grains are unprocessed while
grains that make up white flours only make up 60 percent of the
original grain. Why does it matter? Because the 40 percent
that’s taken out of the equation is the healthiest part of the
grain. Whole wheat grains are made up of three parts: the
endosperm, the bran and the germ. The most nutritious parts are
the bran and germ, both of which are removed from white flour
(leaving only the endosperm). While the endosperm provides
energy with carbohydrates and protein, the bran contains fiber,
vitamin B and minerals that we might not get from other parts of
our diets. Along the same lines, the germ contains antioxidants
and other vitamins for more nourishment. It’s not a health
trend, it’s a well known fact.




Whole Wheat Bread Recipes


Bread is one of the biggest uses for flour and is widely
consumed alongside dinners, in sandwiches, you name it. Make the
healthier choice and choose whole wheat breads instead.

Whole Wheat Bread


This is simple and good for you.

Ingredients


1 pkg. yeast


1/2 C. warm water


1 C. milk, scalded


1/2 C. brown sugar


1 Tbs. salt


1/4 C. melted butter


1 C. cool water


6 C. whole wheat flour



Directions



Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Soak yeast in warm water. Pour hot
milk over sugar, salt and butter. Stir until melted, then add
yeast and cool water. Work in flour. If dough is still sticky,
use a little more flour. Bake for 50-60 minutes.





More Whole Wheat Bread Recipes:
Whole Wheat Nut Bread
Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread
Hearty Whole Wheat and Sweet Banana Bread
Whole Wheat Pasta Recipes





If you buy your pasta from a grocery store, consider buying
whole wheat pastas like Barilla Whole Grain or Ronzoni Healthy
Harvest. The taste is almost identical to the pasta you're
already used to, if not more earthy and more flavorful. All it
takes is choosing a different box of pasta – it's no more money
out of your budget, no sacrifice in taste, just a whole lot of
nutrients!





Of course you can always make your own too, with whole wheat
flour. Here are some recipes:

Fresh Whole Wheat Pasta



The flavor of whole-wheat noodles (bigoli) is particularly
suited to sauces that feature anchovies.

Ingredients



3 C. whole-wheat flour combined with 1 C. flour or unbleached




all-purpose flour
5 extra large eggs
2 Tbs. olive oil

Directions

Combine the flours and salt, if using, directly on a large
pastry board or smooth work surface. Make a well in the center
of the flour. Lightly beat the eggs with olive oil and pour the
mixture into the well. Using a fork, gradually draw in the flour
from the inside wall of the well. Beat gently in a constant
direction to prevent air pockets from forming.

Use your free hand to protect the outer wall until the wet
mixture is well integrated. When the mixture becomes too stiff
to work with a fork, scrape the dough from the fork into the
well and continue forming the dough with your hands. Draw in the
flour very gradually from the bottom of the wall, again being
careful to keep air out of the dough and prevent air pockets
from forming. Continue forming the dough into a very soft ball.
It should be firm enough to handle, but soft and very pliable.
If there is too much flour to be absorbed, do not use it all.
Conversely, work in a little more flour if necessary. The
perfect consistency is soft but not sticky, responsive to being
touched and worked with.

Using the heels of your hands, flatten the dough ball and knead
it from the middle outward, folding it in half after working it
each time. Knead both sides, maintaining a round shape, for
about 14 minutes, until the dough is even and elastic. Cover the
dough with an inverted bowl or plastic wrap and let it rest for
15 minutes, or up to 3 hours.

Mixing Dough in a Food Processor

Pasta dough can be mixed in a food processor. Place the dry
ingredients in the bowl. Combine the eggs, oil, salt, and any
other flavoring such as tomato paste separately, then pour into
the bowl. Turn the machine on and process until a ball is formed
and the ingredients are well mixed. If the mixture is to dry to
form a ball, add a little water and pulse once.

Note: Cut the dough using a spaghetti-cutting attachment or cut
it into tagliatelle noodles.

Yields: 2 lb. (1kg) fresh pasta

More Whole Wheat Pasta Recipes:


Whole Wheat Noodle Casserole


Whole Wheat Pasta


Whole Wheat Tortilla Recipe



Whether you're making enchiladas, wraps, quesadillas, you name
it, there's no reason you can't use a whole wheat tortilla. Just
remember anything that's made with flour can be made with whole
wheat!

Whole Wheat Tortillas



These healthy tortillas can be used for many different sandwich
wraps, and are especially good for those watching their carbs.

Ingredients



2 C. White Whole Wheat King Arthur Flour




1 tsp. salt


1-1/2 tsp. baking powder


1 Tbs. shortening


2/3 C. cold water



Directions



Sift dry ingredients into a medium mixing bowl. Cut in
shortening and add enough cold water to make a stiff dough.
Knead on a lightly floured board. Make small balls, pat thin.
Bake on a soapstone or lightly greased griddle. Yields 12. It's
much easier if you happen to own or have access to a tortilla
press, it's sometimes difficult for newcomers to pat these thin
enough. Standard tortillas are 6 inches in diameter.
Whole Wheat Pizza Recipe





Pizza can sometimes be an indulgence but it doesn't have to be
with whole wheat crust! Make this kid-friendly favorite more
nutritious for the whole family.

Whole Wheat Pizza





This is a quick and simple recipe that makes a good pizza that
is healthy for you.

Ingredients



3/4 C. warm water


1 pkg. dry yeast


2 C. whole wheat flour


2 Tbs. olive oil


1 pinch sugar


1/2 tsp. honey


1 bag shredded low-fat mozzarella cheese


6 oz. pizza sauce



Toppings of your choice



Directions





Mix together yeast water, sugar and honey. Add flour. Knead.
Put oil on bottom of your bowl and place dough on top. Roll
around in the oil and cover. Let set and rise for 30 minutes.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease pizza pan. Roll out dough to
size and roll up the edges of the dough to form a wall so your
toppings don't spread out of the pizza. Poke holes on bottom of
the dough. Pour sauce and spread out. Cover with 1/3 of the
cheese. Put half the toppings. Put another 1/3 of the cheese,
the rest of the toppings and then the rest of the cheese. Bake
for 25 minutes or until cheese is melted.
Whole Wheat Dessert Recipes





Many people associate whole wheat with breads and bread
products, but many desserts can also be made with whole wheat
flour. Consider using whole wheat flour in your next cake, batch
of muffins or cookies!

Whole Wheat Pastry Crust



Here is a recipe for pastry crust, it is very simple and easy
to follow and this is made by using whole wheat flour.

Ingredients



1 C. whole wheat pastry flour


2 Tbsp. sugar


1/2 tsp. salt


6 Tbsp. butter, softened


1 egg yolk
1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 Tbsp. lemon juice (seeds removed)



Directions



In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Add the
softened butter and work together with your fingertips or a
pastry blender. Make a well in the center of the mixture (push
the flour mixture to the sides of the bowl) and add the egg
yolk, vanilla, and lemon juice. Mix the wet ingredients together
with your fingertips and slowly incorporate the dry ingredients
until the dough forms a ball and no longer adheres to your
hands. Cover with waxed paper and refrigerate for at least 30
minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Butter and flour a
9-inch tart or pie pan. Roll out the chilled dough on a floured
board (see Note). Place the dough into the pie or tart pan and
bake for 7 to 10 minutes, until golden brown.



Note: Sometimes whole wheat dough can be difficult to roll out.
If you have a problem, simply press the dough with your
fingertips into the pie or tart pan. Double this recipe if you
want a pinch crust or lattice weave.



About the Author: Hillary Marshak is a writer and editor for
http://Recipe4Living.com, a popular recipe sharing Website. For
more articles like this, or for a large collection of recipes,
visit the site at http://www.Recipe4Living.com.



Source: http://www.isnare.com

Permanent Link:
http://www.isnare.com/?aid=312097&ca=Food+and+Drinks










We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes



Note: I made this switch myself a year ago and I really don't miss the white bread at all. barb

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Angel Food Cake Treat is a diabetic friendly snack anytime







Tonight I had just a fantastic dessert right at home that was completely healthy, sugar free and tasted great. I buy my sugar free angel food cakes at Walmart Supercenter, hope you can find them at yours. They're really good and the entire cake is only about $3.00. Since it makes you 6 servings I think that's fairly good.



Angel Food Cake slice
1 tbsp sugar free cool whip topping

1 tbsp heated in microwave Smucker's sugar free Caramel Topping



As my favorite Rachael Ray would say "Yumm-o"! It's better than a cupcake!





We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Monday, October 27, 2008

Use Pantry Freezer Leftovers To Make New Dinner Recipes Fast and Easy Diabetic Snacker

The Pantry Box involves eating

a whole meal just from food you have on hand in the pantry. Do this

once every couple of weeks and you’ll use up some of the food that has been

sitting around in your pantry for awhile that you may have ovetlooked or forgotten. And having a bowl of cereal does not count!


At least once a month have a Freezer only meal where you have to eat items only from the freezer! A whole meal not just a frozen pizza. You'll clear up room on some of your much needed shelves and save money at the same time.

Once you start doing these procedures you'll probably like it so much that you will start doing it more and more and emptying more spaces for new inventory to come in. Try some new combinations or just some new dishes and have fun.

















We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

http://directorylanesuperstore.blogspot.com/

Diabetic Snacker Recipes Meal Planning Ideals Recipe Generator You Pick Ingredients Get Recipes

Recipe Generator I like; You just type in what ingredients you

want to use and it will give you a choice of recipes to make

using those ingredients. It's really cool!

Super Cook Recipe Generator



We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Sunday, October 26, 2008

Healthier Diabetic Orange French Toast Breakfast Recipe Diabetes Snacker







Healthier Diabetic Orange French toast



1/2 cup powdered milk (already made)


1/2 tsp wheat flour


1 1/2 teaspoons splenda


1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast


1/2 teaspoon cinnamon


2 slices whole wheat bread


1 teaspoon orange zest





Topping: 1 small orange peeled & sliced for the top with
your 1/4 cup sugar free pancake syrup.




1Mix all ingredients together.

Then soak bread for 2 minutes

wetting both sides.

Fry in a nonstick skillet spray with butter

flavored spray.












welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Diabetic Sugar Free Pecan Candies Recipe Diabetics Snacker

Diabetic Sugar Free Pecan Candies



4 ounces pecan halves chopped

1/4 cup splenda


1 egg white


1/4 teaspoon salt


1/2 teaspoon cinnamon


1/4 teaspoon water


1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice




Beat egg white with a whisk and then add to the mixing bowl.



Mix all ingredients in with the egg white.

Bake on 200 degrees

cookie sheet sprayed with nonstick spray. Let bake for about 45

minutes.



Serves 1. Makes a great gift!













We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Saturday, October 25, 2008

Keeping an Apple From Browning Food Kitchen Tips Diabetic Snacker Food Meal Planning

I'm finding that I can't get an apple to stop changing to it's brownish color before I can get it eaten. I've tried the trick with the juice from a lemon on it but I don't really like the flavor that gives. I tried an orange and it didn't slow down the process that much.

Tonight I've decided I'm going to just put an apple on the table with a cutting board and a knife and let my son slice it for me at supper. That's the only thing I've come up with to be able to eat it fresh.

What do you use to stop an apple from browning?



We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Recipes Diabetic Snacker Ribs Dry Rub Mix Recipe make your own better than a restaurant save money

Dry Ribs Rub Mix Good For Diabetics




Blend in a large bowl



1 tbsp cumin


1 tbsp chili powder


2 tbsp kosher salt


1 tsp black pepper


1 tbsp onion powder


1 tbsp garlic powder


1 tbsp paprika


1 tsp cayenne pepper


1 tbsp splenda brown sugar substitute




This makes 9 tablespoons of mix which is for about 2 slabs of ribs.

We use this rub all the time and love it!

We've had it on chicken, ribs and beef. So far, it's been good on anything we've put it on.





My number has always been right in the 105-114 testing range everytime I've had this mixture on any type of meat so enjoy!





We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Tonight's Supper Dinner Recipe Tenderloin Sandwiches Diabetic Snacker

Tonight I had one of my all time favorite meals for supper. One I probably shouldn't have had, ha. Anyway, I had this:

4oz tenderloin sandwich
small whole wheat bun
3oz sweet potato french fries


It was a great homemade meal and delicious if I may add. I didn't take my testing number as I figured it would be high and I was kind of celebrating by not taking my number. I've been doing good and eating all the right things and all the right snacks for weeks now with no mess ups so I felt I deserved it.

I guess we're allowed to do that once in awile. Do you ever do that for yourself?


We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Thursday, October 23, 2008

Foods That Give You Energy and protein are best Diabetic Snacker Meal Planning Tips For Diabetes

Here's a list of foods that everyone should be eating if you need an extra pickup.
I only eat 6 of them myself so I'm not much to speack of. I guess we all should be eating them to help lower our blood sugar numbers and feel better with more energy.

Foods that give you Energy


Asparagus

Broccoli

Grapes

Green Beans

Oats

Peaches

Spinach

Sunflower Seeds

Sweet Potatoes

Wheat







We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Monday, October 20, 2008

Diabetic Snacker Tonight's Dinner Was Okay Not Great Frozen Fruit Is Strange






Tonight's dinner was good something I hadn't eaten in this combination before so I tried it. I had this:



1 ball park angus hot dog

1 whole wheat hot dog bun
1/4 cup of leftover chili

10 munchos chips

1/2 cup assorted frozen fruits

2 tbsp sugar free cool whip



It was pretty good. I'm so used to eating 2 hot dogs when I eat hot dogs but I made it since I added such a variety of other things to round out the meal. I still missed my 2nd hot dog though. I'm not a huge fan of the frozen fruits in the bags. I had let them thaw in the fridge and they leaked thru the bag and made a small mess of sticky red liquid. That wasn't fun to clean up. And the peaches in it were kind of hard still. But, overall the flavor was good. I think I'll stick to my fruits being seperated from now on. They seem to all have the same flavor to them when you have a bag of frozen. At least my number was good at 144.

Do you buy frozen fruits and do you like them?



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lickinawayst-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creative

ASIN=B000E1DR32">I'm Addicted To This Stuff Sugar-Free

Chocolate Pudding

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o=1&a=B000E1DR32" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt=""

style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />



We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Top Five Spices to Add Zing to Holiday Baking Diabetic Snacker Making Foods Recipes Taste Better

Top Five Spices to Add Zing to Holiday Baking

(ARA) - It's hard to imagine a festive winter holiday

without the aroma of baking wafting through our homes. Certain

spices -- such as allspice, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and

vanilla -- claim the holidays as their own.



"Baking is an integral part of the holidays, and there are

certain spices that are integral to the holiday baker," says

Kendall McFarland, product development manager at Frontier

Natural Products Co-op. "Many of the most popular recipes use

the same types of spices, and these spices most certainly take

the cake, so to speak."



* Allspice -- Many people believe allspice is a mixture of

cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg, hence the name, but it is

actually the dried fruit of a small evergreen plant. It is

especially delicious in cakes, cookies and pies.



* Cinnamon -- One of the oldest and most widely used spices,

cinnamon has a variety of uses and is a staple in most

household spice racks. It is made from the bark of a cinnamon

tree, which rolls up into what is commonly known as a cinnamon

stick during the drying process. Easily recognized by its

aroma, cinnamon adds warm sweetness to fruit pies -- it pairs

especially well with apples.



* Cloves -- One of the earliest spices to be traded, cloves are

native to Indonesia and are actually dried flower buds. Ground

cloves are used in baking and are most often found in

gingerbread, spice and fruit cakes, raisin or nut bars. Cloves

add a kick to pumpkin pie, a traditional holiday favorite.

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* Nutmeg -- Historically a prized spice, nutmegs are the dried

seeds of the nutmeg tree. Nutmeg's sweet taste is excellent in

puddings and custards, and it’s delicious mixed in with French

toast batter. Try freshly grating a whole nutmeg for even more

flavor.



* Vanilla -- Introduced to Europe by the Spanish conquistador,

Hernando Cortes, vanilla has a rich history and a richer

flavor. It comes in three forms: whole pod, powder, and

extract. It is one of the most widely used ingredients in baked

desserts and icings.  



These spices can be used independently, or as a complement to

each other to produce rich and interesting flavors. The key is

to buy high-quality spices that contain robust flavors and

aromas. “Frontier Natural Products Co-op offers a complete

selection of natural and organic spices and seasonings in

bottles, or take just the amount you need from their bulk bins.

The superior flavor of their spices is a direct result of their

commitment to quality at every step -- growing, processing and

packaging,” McFarland states.



Try this cake and fill your home with spicy holiday aromas:

/>


Honey Spice Cake



1/2 cup butter

1 cup honey

2 eggs

3/4 cup buttermilk or yogurt

2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp. ground cloves

1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg

1 cup raisins that have been softened by soaking, drained

/>


Preheat oven to 350 F. Beat butter, honey and eggs together.

Add buttermilk, mix well. Sift dry ingredients together, and

add to the butter mixture. Mix well. Stir in the raisins. Pour

into 8-inch square cake pan. Bake for 30 minutes or until done.

Frost with this delicious cream cheese recipe.



1/2 lb. cream cheese, softened

1/4 cup unsalted butter

1 tsp. vanilla extract

3 cups powdered sugar



Make cream cheese frosting by combining ingredients in a mixing

bowl. Beat with an electric mixer until smooth. Add powdered

sugar and continue beating until smooth. Spread frosting over

top and sides of cake.



For more information on spices, holiday recipes, and cooking

ideas, visit the Frontier Natural Products Web site at

www.frontiercoop.com.



Courtesy of ARAcontent





There are many foods and especially spices that do add zing to meals. My favorite is oregano as it brings just a nice overall freshness to whatever you put it on. My kids think it stinks but I could smell it all day long and never get tired of it.





We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Saturday, October 18, 2008

Diabetic Snacker Healthy Eating Tips To Stop Holiday Weight Gain Christmas Is Coming

Ways to Ward Off Holiday Weight Gain

- Each year we see it coming. As the

holidays head our way, we brace for the weight gain that often

results from the traditional sweets of the season. Many of us

gain a pound or two between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day,

according to the National Institute of Child Health and Human

Development. What’s more, we rarely lose the extra weight

during the spring and summer, the New England Journal of

Medicine reports.



Fortunately, you can avoid those unwanted extra pounds with a

common sense approach to your health. With some expert advice,

it’s possible to stay fit as we face the season of bountiful

desserts.



“It’s not an accident to be healthy,” says C. Howie Howard, a

health-conscious cook and student advisor at Brown Mackie

College in Kansas City, Kan. “Most people don’t realize how

food influences them.” For instance, when we eat fast food, we

tend to feel tired an hour later. This is because the typical

fast food meal contains high glycemic carbohydrates that break

down quickly, releasing a rush of glucose into the bloodstream,

which creates a feeling of sleepiness. Few of us link the meal

we ate to the way we feel. We think we’re just tired. “If you

listen to your body, it will become easier to discern how the

foods you eat make you feel,” Howard says.



As an experiment in recognizing how your body reacts to food,

Howard suggests eating a hard-boiled egg and fresh fruit for

lunch. An hour later, take note of your energy level. You won’t

feel the fatigue of a fast food “crash” because the

carbohydrates in these low glycemic foods break down slowly,

releasing glucose into the blood stream gradually. “The whole

idea is to find ways to eat that are both enjoyable and

satisfying,” he says.



Terry Harris, assistant director of admissions at Brown Mackie

College in Findlay, Ohio is a certified specialist in health,

fitness and nutrition. He ran a full-time personal fitness

training business in the Toledo/Perrysburg area of Ohio for

nearly a decade, and now offers nutrition consultations on a

part-time basis. “The first thing I tell clients is to relax.

Stress makes the chocolate attack worse,” Harris says.



“One thing you can do leading up to the holidays is focus on

your caloric intake each day.” Harris recommends eating meals

comprised of different colors, which helps to cover each food

group, with each serving about the size of your palm. “You

don’t have to deny yourself dessert. You can shave calories

from each meal to make room for it without consuming extra

calories,” Harris says.



Michael Baker, associate director of admission at Brown Mackie

College in North Canton, Ohio is an avid runner who took first

place in the Portage Lakes Triathlon in Akron, Ohio last

September. Baker stresses the importance of movement, and

offered tips on how to fit exercise into a busy schedule.



“When heading out to do holiday shopping, plan to park as far

away from the door as possible,” Baker says. “This relieves any

disappointment you may feel when the lot is crowded, and the

walk will do you good.” Baker also suggests exercising while

watching your favorite television shows. “You don’t have to go

to the gym to get yourself moving,” he says.



Ernest Angelini, business manager in the student services

department at Brown Mackie College in Louisville, Ky. agrees

that exercising doesn’t have to interrupt your schedule. “You

can do leg lifts at your desk while you work,” he says. “And

always take the stairs instead of the elevator.”



Angelini offers this advice for partygoers: “It’s best not to

go to a party hungry. Eat sensibly before arriving. You’re sure

to find delectable food, but keep in mind that the main reason

you’re there is to spend time with others. Taste the sweets,

but don’t gorge. Moderation is the key.”



Angelini has also come up with a clever way to ensure

self-control when faced with holiday goodies. “I always plan a

vacation to the sun belt after the holidays,” he says. Knowing

that you’ll soon don a swimsuit can do wonders for the

“moderation theory” when holiday temptation hits.



Courtesy of ARAcontent






We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Friday, October 17, 2008

Eat Breakfast and Lose Weight Naturally Loss Tips Tricks Meal Planning Diabetic Snacker

Eat Breakfast and Lose Weight

– Whether you’re skipping breakfast to

save on calories or running out the door in a rush with only a

cup of coffee in hand, you’re not doing yourself or your health

any favors. Numerous studies have shown that eating breakfast

can help people lose weight while promoting heart health,

cognitive performance and increased energy.  



According to a study published in the Journal of the American

Dietetic Association, women who ate breakfast regularly tended

to eat fewer calories overall during the day. A healthy

breakfast fuels the body and replenishes blood sugar levels to

rev up metabolism for maximum calorie burn from morning until

night.



Skipping breakfast deprives the body of the fuel it needs and

often leads to impulsive snacking later in the morning.

According to a study conducted by the Weight Watchers Smart

Ones brand in 2008, two-thirds of Americans believe eating

breakfast will help them maintain their weight. Surprisingly,

25 percent of those same men and women admit skipping breakfast

as their worst breakfast habit!  For such breakfast

offenders, the 10:30 a.m. run to the office vending machine can

be all too common and may mean unhealthy choices.



To break bad habits, food lovers can actually focus on the most

appealing part of their morning meal -- great taste. In the

same Smart Ones brand survey, eight in 10 people ranked good

taste as most important when considering what to eat for

breakfast.  



Devin Alexander, television host and author of “The Most

Decadent Diet Ever,” offers simple solutions for maintaining a

healthy eating regimen in the morning without sacrificing taste

or resorting to the same old boring routine.  “There are a

variety of low-fat, flavorful foods that help you start the day

the right way, even if you’re too time crunched to cook,” says

Alexander.



She recommends new choices from the Weight Watchers Smart Ones

Morning Express breakfast line as a nutritious way to sneak

breakfast in each day. The line boasts four convenient and

delicious varieties, including the savory Breakfast Quesadilla

and a Stuffed Breakfast Sandwich, which can be ready in the

microwave in three minutes or less, contain 240 calories or

less, and are made with lean proteins, low-fat cheeses,

vegetables and egg whites for a healthy start to the day.



Alexander offers a few other tips for quick, delicious morning

meals:



* Make a large container of oatmeal to last for the week and

store it in the refrigerator. Each morning, reheat the oatmeal

and flavor it with your favorite fresh fruit or fruit spread

for a finished breakfast in minutes.



* Always leave a bowl of fresh fruit on the counter, so you

never walk out the door hungry even if you’re in a rush.



* You can never buy too much yogurt. Try a variety of flavors

for a quick, calcium-pick me-up.



Now, Devin brings her tips and advice to the masses on The

Morning Express Breakfast Club (eatyourbest.com/breakfastclub),

an online destination for healthy breakfast recipes, tips and

advice to fuel the day with ideas that appeal to everyone from

breakfast connoisseurs to women on the go.



The secret to eating right and maintaining a healthy lifestyle

is to make smart choices that are good for you, but also taste

good, too. So listen to the advice your mother gave you and

don’t skip the most important meal of the day.



Courtesy of ARAcontent



http://directorylanesuperstore.blogspot.com/





We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Boost Your Memory Diabetic Snacker Keeping Your Focus With Diabetes

Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Boost Your Memory



- Do you ever find yourself at the

grocery store struggling to remember what you came for? Are you

forgetting birthdays and lunch dates? If these situations sound

familiar to you, you're not alone. Forgetfulness is one of the

most common complaints of those in middle age and beyond.



Memory loss and Alzheimer's disease rank high on the list of

senior fears. Alzheimer's was the No. 1 fear of aging,

according to research conducted by Bankers Life and Casualty

Company, a national life and health insurer that focuses on

serving the retirement needs of the middle market. Similarly, a

national poll by Research!America and PARADE magazine showed

that adults were more than twice as likely to fear losing their

mental capacity as their physical ability.



The good news is according to researchers at John Hopkins, most

memory loss has nothing to do with Alzheimer's disease. Nearly

all of us, they say, take more time to learn and recall

information as we age.



There are simple things that you can do in your everyday life

to increase your ability to retain information and exercise

your brain.



Engage your brain.

Mentally stimulating activities strengthen brain cells and the

connection between them. You can keep those cells in shape by

giving them a workout. Instead of passively watching TV, try

something that engages your brain: reading, writing, taking a

class, doing a crossword puzzle or even learning a new game to

play with family members.



Stay in touch.

Loneliness is linked to depression, a risk factor for memory

loss. Try to keep your social network strong by volunteering or

simply helping a neighbor. Make a conscious effort to stay

connected with friends and relatives by visiting with them or

keeping in touch by phone or e-mail.



Eat healthy.

Maintaining a balanced diet, low in saturated fats is said to

be better for cognitive functioning. In addition, the

Alzheimer's Association notes growing evidence that a diet rich

in dark vegetables and fruits -- which contain antioxidants --

may help protect brain cells.



Stay active.

Regular exercise can increase oxygen to the brain. It can also

lower the risk for diseases that can lead to memory loss, such

as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Your doctor can help

you develop an exercise regime that's best for you.



When to seek help.

"It's important to know the difference between normal

forgetting and something more serious," says Scott Perry,

president of Bankers Life and Casualty Company, who serves on

the board of directors of his local Alzheimer's Association

chapter.



Serious memory problems, according to the National Institute on

Aging, are those that affect a person's ability to perform

everyday activities. For example:  



* Asking the same questions over and over.



* Becoming lost in familiar places.



* Not being able to follow directions.



* Getting very confused about time, people and places.



* Losing interest in daily activities such as grooming and

eating.



If you have concerns about your memory, talk to your doctor

right away. For more topics of interest, visit www.bankers.com

and click "Senior Resources."



Courtesy of ARAcontent



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We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Goodbye Junk Food, Hello Smart Food Choices Smart Recipe Tips Changes Updates Healthy Eating Living Diabetic Snacker

Goodbye Junk Food, Hello Smart Food Choices  



– Buying nutritious foods for yourself

and your family can be difficult. We are all familiar with the

food pyramid, but once in the grocery store, the incredible

amount of options is overwhelming. How do you know what is best

and how can you be sure to make the healthiest food choices?





Here are the top strategies for shopping smart at the grocery

store:



* Plan, plan, plan.

Planning is key for nutritious shopping. First, plan to eat

before you go to the store. When you’re not hungry you’ll be

less enticed to buy snacks and other foods you really don’t

need. Second, make a shopping list of the meals you want to

make throughout the week. By thinking ahead, you can

incorporate healthy foods and you’ll avoid buying prepackaged,

often high-fat and high-sodium dinners.

Finally, have a

shopping budget. For example, allot $200 to feed your family

for the next two weeks. This will help you avoid going

overboard with unnecessary treats.



* Shop the perimeter.

The perimeter of the grocery store usually holds the most

nutritious items like fresh produce and meat. The majority of

your budget should be allocated to foods located on the

perimeter. When shopping for fruits and vegetables, choose a

variety of colors. Different colors equal different vitamins

and minerals so a colorful selection is best. When choosing

meats, lean cuts and skinless poultry are healthier choices.

And don’t forget about fish -- a great source of healthy

omega-3 fats.



* Let your grocery store help you.

Let’s face it, nutrition labels can be confusing. Food Lion and

Bloom grocery stores, located in the southeast and mid-Atlantic

states, have implemented the Guiding Stars nutrition navigation

program. Developed by independent scientific experts, foods are

assigned one-, two-, or three-star values based on their

nutritional content, with three stars being the best. The

system follows a specific algorithm and is the first of its

kind in the United States. So the next time you’re at your

local Food Lion or Bloom store, or you visit one while

traveling, you can simply look on the unit price tag located on

the shelf for the star rating. Shopping nutritiously has never

been easier.



* Know what to look for in processed foods.

Although you might stock your cart with a lot of fresh produce,

meats and dairy items, you will inevitably buy some type of

processed foods. This doesn’t have to be a bad thing as long as

you know what to look for. For example, when buying cereal and

pastas, look for whole-grain options. Items with long lists of

ingredients you can’t pronounce should generally be avoided.





Foods that are labeled 100 percent juice or 100 percent whole

grains are better choices. Chips and other snacks should not

contain unhealthy trans fats, which you’ll find listed in the

nutrition label. Finally, a little indulgence is fine, but look

at the serving size on your favorite treats. That morning

beverage you enjoy on the way to work might really be three

servings, or you might be eating four servings during your

afternoon snack fix.



By following these strategies, you’ll be on your way to

healthier shopping and better nutrition in no time. For more

information visit www.GuidingStars.com.



Courtesy of ARAcontent


We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Mushrooms Are Healthy So Eat Them In Season Eating For Life When You Have Diabetes Diabetic Snacker

Make Mushrooms Your Pick of the Season

(ARA) – Long overlooked, mushrooms are nature’s hidden

treasure for helping those focusing on living a healthful life.

To promote the nutritional benefits of fresh produce this

back-to-school season, Weight Watchers continues Pick of the

Season, a public health initiative spotlighting seasonal fruit

and vegetables, with recipes this quarter for mushrooms, a

produce selection so versatile it can add flare to any every

day meal.



Did you know? Mushrooms are the only fresh fruit or vegetable

that has four percent of the Daily Value of vitamin D (per

serving of 4-5 white button mushrooms specifically).



Mushrooms are also nutrient rich, providing a similar number of

nutrients as many brightly colored fruits and vegetables. For

instance, mushrooms provide the B vitamins riboflavin, niacin

and pantothenic acid. White, Portabella and crimini mushrooms

have natural antioxidants and in fact, are the leading source

of the antioxidant selenium in the fruit and vegetable

category. Mushrooms are also fat-free, cholesterol-free and

very low in sodium.



In addition, mushrooms have umami. Also known as the “fifth

taste,” umami foods are described as hearty or savory. The high

water content and very low energy (calorie) density of

mushrooms help to satisfy hunger.



In the kitchen, nothing beats the versatility of mushrooms;

they work in everything from soups and salads to main dishes

and appetizers and are easy to prepare. Simply sauté and in

fewer than 10 minutes you can add flavor and texture to any

favorite family meal. Just toss in a handful of mushrooms to

enjoy a boost of delicious flavor and nutrition.



Below are four recipes that highlight the savory taste of

mushrooms: Mini Mushroom Burgers; Tilapia with Mushrooms,

Olives and Tomatoes; Turkey Mushroom Soup; and Mushroom Chicken

Piccata.



Pick of the Season – Mushroom Recipes:



* Mini Mushroom Burgers

Makes 4 servings



Ingredients

2 Portabella mushrooms, stem removed

1/4 cup light balsamic vinaigrette

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

8 small high-fiber whole grain dinner rolls

8 slices red onion

8 slices tomato



Preparation

1. Place Portabellas and vinaigrette in a large zip top bag.

Zip and lightly rub the vinaigrette into the mushrooms. Let

marinate for at least 30 minutes.



2. Remove mushrooms from bag, drain and season both sides with

salt and pepper. Heat a grill or grill pan over medium heat and

spray with non-stick cooking spray. Place the mushrooms on the

grill gill side down and cook for 4 minutes. Turn and continue

to grill until mushroom is almost cooked through, about 4 more

minutes.



3. Remove from pan and drain mushrooms on paper towel, gill

side down. Cut each mushroom into quarters and place on buns.

Top with onion and tomato and serve.



POINTS value per serving: 2, 144 calories, 5g fat, 5g fiber

/>


* Tilapia with Mushrooms, Olives and Tomatoes

Makes 4 servings



Ingredients

4 teaspoons olive oil, divided

1 tablespoon finely minced garlic (about 3 cloves)

1 pound (16 ounces) button mushrooms, quartered

1/4 cup pitted green olives with juice, halved

2 cups halved grape tomatoes

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, removed from stem and chopped

1 tablespoon fresh basil, finely chopped

4 skinless tilapia filets

Salt and freshly ground black pepper



Preparation

1. Heat 2 teaspoons olive oil in large non-stick skillet over

medium-high heat. Add garlic and a single layer of mushrooms

and cook, without stirring, for about 5 minutes or until

mushrooms become red-brown on one side. Flip and cook about 5

minutes more, until other side is same color. Add olives,

tomatoes and herbs and heat for another 2 minutes, until juice

is evaporated. Remove from heat, place in a bowl and cover with

foil to keep warm.



2. In the same sauté pan, heat remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil

over medium heat. Season the filets with salt and pepper on

both sides and place in the pan. Cook for 3 minutes until

nicely browned, gently turn and cook another 3 minutes. Return

vegetables and herbs to skillet briefly to warm, then serve.

/>


POINTS value per serving: 4, 196 calories, 7.5g fat, 2g

fiber



* Turkey Mushroom Soup

Makes 8 servings



Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil

8 ounces white button mushrooms, quartered

1 cup chopped onion (about 1 large onion)

1 tablespoon finely minced garlic (about 3 cloves)

1/4 cup chopped celery (about 3 stalks)

8 cups low-sodium turkey stock (or store bought chicken

broth)

2 fresh sage leaves, finely chopped

8 ounces (about 2 cups) cooked turkey (or chicken), removed

from the bone and shredded

1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

2 cups packed fresh baby spinach (a large handful)

1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper



Preparation

1. Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add a single

layer of mushrooms and cook, without stirring, for about 5

minutes or until mushrooms become red-brown on one side. Add

onions, garlic and celery and sauté until translucent, about 5

more minutes. Add turkey stock (see recipe below) or chicken

broth, turkey and sage. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat

for 20 minutes.



2. Add rinsed beans, spinach, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil to wilt spinach and serve hot.



3. To make turkey stock: Place turkey bones in a large stock

pot and cover with cold water. Add 1 quartered onion, 2

coarsely chopped stalks of celery, 1 coarsely chopped carrot, 1

bay leaf and 2 sage leaves. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a

low simmer and cook 2 or more hours. Strain and skim fat from

top and store stock for future use.



POINTS value per serving: 2, 120 calories, 3g fat, 3g fiber

/>


* Mushroom Chicken Piccata

Makes 4 servings



Ingredients

4 chicken cutlets (4 oz each)

Salt

Freshly ground black pepper

4 teaspoons olive oil, divided

12 ounces crimini mushrooms, quartered

1/2 cup dry white wine

1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth

1 lemon

2 tablespoons capers, with juice

2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic



Preparation

1. Season chicken with salt and pepper on both sides and heat a

large sauté pan over medium heat. Add 2 teaspoons olive oil and

warm briefly, then add chicken and cook until nicely browned,

about 2 minutes per side. Remove to a plate and cover.



2. In the same pan, warm the remaining olive oil over

medium-high heat. Add a single layer of mushrooms and cook,

without stirring, for about 5 minutes or until mushrooms become

red-brown on one side. Flip mushrooms, add garlic and cook

another 2 minutes. Add wine and scrape up any browned bits in

the pan. Bring to a boil and add stock, then return heat until

it is bubbling nicely. Slice 4 very thin slices of lemon and

add to the pan along with the juice from half of the lemon. Add

capers and continue cooking sauce till it becomes a glaze,

about 2 more minutes. Add the chicken to the sauce and heat

through, then serve.



POINTS value per serving: 4, 199 calories, 6g fat, 2g fiber

/>


These recipes reflect the food values inherent to the Weight

Watchers philosophy that eating should be satisfying as well as

healthy. In fact, learning and sharing innovative ideas about

healthy cooking and eating are part of the experience at weekly

Weight Watchers meetings, where members help and support each

other.



To learn more about Weight Watchers, visit

www.weightwatchers.com. To find the nearest Weight Watchers

meeting location, call (800) 651-6000, or click on the Find a

Meeting link at the top of the homepage.



For more information about mushrooms, visit the Mushroom

Council at mushroominfo.com.



All recipes courtesy of the Mushroom Council and

mushroominfo.com.



Courtesy of ARAcontent


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We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Bacon Fat Recipe For Cookies? OMG! Are They Trying To Kill Us All? Recipes Diabetic Snacker

Oh my god! I actually saw a recipe on Serious Eats called Bacon

Fat Spice Cookies! Are people just trying to kill themselves or

what? I mean sure we all know butter is bad for us but my

goodness, it has got to be better than using bacon fat! As a

matter of fact the recipe calls for a 1/2 cup of bacon fat.

While I'm sure they would have to taste good because anything

with bacon tastes better, we have to draw a line somewhere and

just decide no I'm not going to start making anything wiht

bacon fat.



Though I haven't had them in over a year I do remember how much

better bacon fat made cornbread taste when you baked it. Or how

great a kettle of pinto beans taste with it or fried potatoes.

I haven't had those recently either. I now use Olive Oil for

all thing like that which is much healthier. Please don't even

dare to make these cookies if you do hunt up the recipe!

It makes me wonder what is next? Sausage Gravy over twinkies?

How do you feel about this?





We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Chicken Parmesan Meal Lightened Up healthier Eats Italian Favorites Recipe Dinner Diabetic Snacker

Last night's dinner was very good and my testing number was only 122 so I'll definitely have this again.



Chicken Parmesan



4 oz Chicken Breast coated with breadcrumbs, sauteed then baked in oven


1/2 cup green beans with garlic & oregano


1 slice garlic bread Pepperidge Farms toast


6 pcs. Oreida Parmesan & Garlic Potatoes


1 Hershey Kiss cherry cordial






It occurred to me while typing this that I forgot to put any sauce on my plate. I don't like to bake my chicken in the sauce like I fix for everyone else. I just don't like that mushy chicken taste when you bake it like that. I know, I'm the only one who doesn't. Anyway, I didn't eat any sauce with the meal so I guess that's a good thing as I'm sure my number would be up a bit more with the sauce added in. But, you really don't miss the sauce.

We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Today's Lazy Day is just a simple plan Eating Healthy Diabetic Snacker

Today I decided to make a lazy day and just hangout on the computer most of the day. I got up early ate a healthy breakfast of sausage links (lowfat) and toast (whole wheat) and am having my morning diet pepsi. I have to have my morning pepsi or I can't get myself going for the day. It's so sad how the cola companies made us all dependent on their product. I'm not like most people in the world meaning I don't like coffee. I like the smell of coffee but I don't like the taste of it. So my pepsi is my solitude.



Today I've already eaten, showeered, made the beds and picked up the house a bit and they guys are already here to clean the duct system out. Said that should take a couple of hours so I intend to bide my time just sitting here at the computer. Of course I'm using the excuse that I don't want to be in their way. Hmm, I'm wondering to myself why I need an excuse? There's nobody here who cares if I'm on the computer or not so I don't know why I feel like I need an excuse. I think sometimes since I'm a stay at home mom with grown kids who actually work every day I am starting to feel like Peg Bundy! Yuck, that is a sad thought indeed as I hated Peg Bundy when Married With Children was even on. I don't have any bon bons anyway not that I could have one if I did have them since I'm diabetic. I guess I could settle for a little chocolate hershey kiss which has become a favorite treat of mine lately.

Anyway, I'll stop rambling and just say again that today is my lazy day and I'm planning on adding a bunch of content to all my blogs and new items to my website store in case your'e interested in checking it out.

We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Sunday, October 12, 2008

New treat I like Nabisco teddy grahmans review Diabetic Snacker Cute Goodness

Tonight I tried the nabisco teddy grahmans mini packs for the first time and I really enjoyed them. I did stick with only one of the many packages even though I could have definitely ate two of them. They taste like little grahman crackers with a molasses sweetness hint to them. At only 100 calories I'm going to start buying the big boxes of these and make up my own little 100 calorie packs to have on hand whenever I want a sweet snack. Give them a try I'm pretty sure you are going to love them as I did.

I welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Diabetic Snacker Pizza Calzones recipes is a perfect easy dinner plan

Today we made pizza calzones using just a roll recipe for the bread machine. When it was done we divided into 4 huges piesces and rolled them out as flat as they would go and filled them up with provolone sliced cheese, turkey pepperoni and pizza sauce. they only needed to bake for about 15 minutes at 350 degrees and they were excellent. We did sprinkle some oregano and parmesan cheese on their too, both which are okay for diabetics. You should try making these at home because they were fun to make fun and delicious to eat.

welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Thursday, October 9, 2008

Free ECookbook to download Diabetic Snacker Healthy Eating Ideas Meal Planning Tips

Here's a free prize winning recipe e-cookbook:
http://cheftomcooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/prize-winning-recipes.pdf

Geez again I'll repeat this: I hate coming across a new recipe that I think by the title sounds

good only to see this as the first line: "I haven't tried this recipe". If you haven't tried the

recipe yet you shouldn't be posting it on boards for other's to share! I mean you should at

least have tried a recipe once before you can recommend it to others! I know this has been said

before but I'm trying to get a point across as this is a gue pet peeve of mine.


Another pet peeve of mine is the use of the word "pungent" in a recipe title. I don't know about

you, but I'm not even thinking about trying any recipe that has the word pungent in the title!

It just sounds icky to me and I refuse to try it.
http://directorylanesuperstore.blogspot.com/


welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

My Oranges came today from CA Pearson ranch Fresh Citrus Goodness Diabetic Snacker

Wow, my oranges fresh from California came today! I already cut into one after the ups guy dropped off the box, less than an hour ago. It is so good and juicy! It does taste like it was just plucked off a tree a moment ago.

I love getting my monthly oranges delivered. If I hadn't been diabetic I would have never tried an orange. So at least I'm glad something motivated me enough to try one. They are great! I order them online from Pearsonsranch


welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Diabetic Snacker Product Review: How to Choose a Glucose Monitor for Diabetes

How to Choose a Glucose Monitor - Diabetes Testing



8 things to consider before you purchase a monitor.
By Lisette Hilton From Revolution Health
For people with diabetes, glucose monitors are vital for the accurate monitoring of blood sugar

levels throughout the day. There are plenty of types from which to choose, but there is no

one-size-fits-all monitor.

While cost is a factor, the most important things to consider are features that will make you

more likely to use a monitor, says certified diabetes educator Amparo Gonzalez, R.N., the

president-elect of the American Association of Diabetes Educators.

Choosing the right glucose monitor can make a difference in your quality of health in the long

run, Gonzalez says, noting that people with diabetes manage the disease with lifestyle changes

and medication use. "The only way to know if those things are working on a daily basis is to use

a good blood glucose monitor. This is a great piece of technology for a very reasonable price,"

she says.

Blood-glucose monitors generally range in price from $19.99 to $89.99. Before you purchase a

monitor, consider these eight questions:


What will your insurance cover? Some insurers have agreements with the manufacturers of blood

glucose monitors that enable them to offer better prices or coverage on specific brands and

related supplies, says certified diabetes educator Gloria Yee, R.N., of the University of

California, San Francisco Diabetes Teaching Center. If your insurer has restrictions on which

meters it will cover, but the brand it covers doesn't meet your lifestyle needs, ask if you'll

have to pay a higher co-pay to get the monitor you want and whether your supplies for that

monitor will be covered, adds Gonzalez, director of the Georgia Latino Diabetes Education

Program at Emory University in Atlanta.


What will the long-term costs be? The monitor itself is a one-time cost. Medicare and Medicaid

may cover that cost but might limit coverage of testing supplies such as test strips, lancets,

batteries and control solution (liquid that tests the accuracy of the device).


It might be cute, but can you see the numbers? Purchasing the smallest monitor for convenience

won't do you any good if you can't easily read your blood sugar numbers. Test the monitor to

make sure the numbers are big enough for you to see. Another feature to consider is a monitor

that is backlit.


Do you have the dexterity to use the monitor? People with arthritis and other dexterity issues

might be unable to pick up small test strips to insert them into the monitor, Yee says. She

suggests purchasing devices where the test strips are inside a cartridge or drum, so that you

don't need to take individual strips in and out.


Do you need the memory feature and other high-tech perks? Most meters have some level of memory

ranging from one-test to 500-test values held in storage, says certified diabetes educator Sue

McLaughlin, a registered dietitian and the vice president of health care and education for the

American Diabetes Association. "This may be a desired feature for people who feel they don't

have time during the course of the day to record their blood glucose results in their logbook as

well as for historical purposes," she says. "Some meters offer the option of averaging data for

seven, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days, as well as the ability to flag results with comments, categorize

pre- and post-meal test results and to download data to a home or doctor's office computer

system." McLaughlin says that coding the meter is another consideration. Most meters require a

coding procedure to be done by the meter user. However, in several meters, this is an automatic

feature. (Coding calibrates information gathered on a test strip to ensure an accurate meter

reading). "Research has shown, however, that the accuracy of blood glucose results can vary by

10 percent to 43 percent if a meter has not been coded properly. Therefore, if a person has

trouble remembering to perform the coding procedure, this may be a consideration when choosing a

meter," she says.


How much blood will you have to provide? Monitors require different amounts of blood. The less

blood that's involved in each test, the easier it is for the patient, according to Yee. "Why use

more blood than you have to?"


How do you cut out-of-pocket costs? If you have to pay out of your own pocket for a monitor,

know that many companies offer mail-in rebates and other incentives. "Where they make the money

is in the test strips ($1 per strip on average). They might even give out the meters for free,"

Yee says. For that reason, experts say it pays to be careful about the monitor you select. You

don't want to purchase an inexpensive monitor, only to find out that test strips are more costly

than they might be with another monitor.


Did you know you can talk to a diabetes educator? Diabetes educators are trained to educate

people about monitors and to help them manage their overall diabetes care. Some hospitals,

community centers and other organizations offer their services for free or on a sliding scale.

Educators also can point you to local resources if you're having trouble paying for your meter

or supplies. Some offer free monitors.
The good news for people with diabetes is that glucose-monitoring technology is evolving with http://directorylanesuperstore.blogspot.com/

the launch of smaller and faster monitors that collect more data and require less blood.

"[Glucose monitors] used to be the size of a tape recorder, and it took a lot more blood and a

couple of minutes [to get a reading]. Now, they're the size of a car alarm on your key ring -

and the quickest ones [take] five seconds, and the smallest amount of blood is 0.3 microliter

versus a good 10 microliters for the old-fashioned monitors," Yee says.

McLaughlin says that continuous glucose-monitoring systems are an exciting advance for the

future. "They are the next step toward a 'closed-loop system,' where a monitor reads the blood

glucose and transfers the information to an insulin pump that delivers just the right amount of

insulin - thereby, managing the blood glucose more precisely. This technology is anticipated to

greatly improve the quality of life for people with diabetes."



Reviewed by Val Jones, M.D.







We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Diabetic Medicines That Are Working For Me Now Diabetic Snacker

I wanted to post the names of the 2 medicines my doctor has put me on that have really truly finally helped with the pain & swelling in my feet. They are:

1.Amitriptyline (2 at bedtime)
2.Tramadol (2 every 6 hours )

These medicines have been a godsend for me. All the other stuff my doctors had me on did hardly anything, but with these two now in my system I am finally on the right path. I've been taking them for a couple of weeks but actually the Tramadol (for pain), started helping some immediately. I am so glad to have lost that burning, that shooting pain and some of the pain from the swelling. If you have diabetic pain in your feet and legs I'm sure you can relate to what I'm talking about. I just couldn't find on the internet anyone else talking about this horrible pains. Why are there more people talking about this? This needs to known that these 2 medicines together are working! I stopped using the gabepentin it wasn't helping at all. I also still do use the laclotion to help with the cracked dryness in my feet. I urge you to talk to your doctor. Call him and tell him you want to try these medicines if you are having these problems yourself.

We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Monday, October 6, 2008

Diabetic Snacker Smoked Sausage Dinner is one of my all time favorite meals

tonite I had smoked sausage for dinner and it was super delicious. I just put it in the skillet with nonstick cooking spray and let it cook until it was dark on each side. I like it charred looking black. I know I mean burnt but that makes it sound bad. That's the way I like it. My number was good only 112 for this meal which I might add is like a 15 minute meal!


Smoked Sausage 4oz
Munchos Potato Chips
Green Beans 1/2 cup
1 hershey kiss *these are extra terrific little treats) A serving size for these is 9 kisses so if you just have one instead you could have these most likely whenever you really wanted just a bit of chocolate. I find them to be very satisfying.

My bloood glucose # after 2 hours was 112 so it's a keeper.


http://directorylanesuperstore.blogspot.com/




We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

How to Choose a Glucose Monitor Diabetes Testing Diabetic Snacker

How to Choose a Glucose Monitor - Diabetes Testing




8 things to consider before you purchase a monitor.



By Lisette Hilton From Revolution Health


For people with diabetes, glucose monitors are vital for the

accurate monitoring of blood sugar levels throughout the day.

There are plenty of types from which to choose, but there is no

one-size-fits-all monitor.



While cost is a factor, the most important things to consider

are features that will make you more likely to use a monitor,

says certified diabetes educator Amparo Gonzalez, R.N., the

president-elect of the American Association of Diabetes

Educators.



Choosing the right glucose monitor can make a difference in

your quality of health in the long run, Gonzalez says, noting

that people with diabetes manage the disease with lifestyle

changes and medication use. "The only way to know if those

things are working on a daily basis is to use a good blood

glucose monitor. This is a great piece of technology for a very

reasonable price," she says.



Blood-glucose monitors generally range in price from $19.99 to

$89.99. Before you purchase a monitor, consider these eight

questions:




What will your insurance cover? Some insurers have agreements

with the manufacturers of blood glucose monitors that enable

them to offer better prices or coverage on specific brands and

related supplies, says certified diabetes educator Gloria Yee,

R.N., of the University of California, San Francisco Diabetes

Teaching Center. If your insurer has restrictions on which

meters it will cover, but the brand it covers doesn't meet your

lifestyle needs, ask if you'll have to pay a higher co-pay to

get the monitor you want and whether your supplies for that

monitor will be covered, adds Gonzalez, director of the Georgia

Latino Diabetes Education Program at Emory University in

Atlanta.




What will the long-term costs be? The monitor itself is a

one-time cost. Medicare and Medicaid may cover that cost but

might limit coverage of testing supplies such as test strips,

lancets, batteries and control solution (liquid that tests the

accuracy of the device).




It might be cute, but can you see the numbers? Purchasing the

smallest monitor for convenience won't do you any good if you

can't easily read your blood sugar numbers. Test the monitor to

make sure the numbers are big enough for you to see. Another

feature to consider is a monitor that is backlit.




Do you have the dexterity to use the monitor? People with

arthritis and other dexterity issues might be unable to pick up

small test strips to insert them into the monitor, Yee says.

She suggests purchasing devices where the test strips are

inside a cartridge or drum, so that you don't need to take

individual strips in and out.




Do you need the memory feature and other high-tech perks? Most

meters have some level of memory ranging from one-test to

500-test values held in storage, says certified diabetes

educator Sue McLaughlin, a registered dietitian and the vice

president of health care and education for the American

Diabetes Association. "This may be a desired feature for people

who feel they don't have time during the course of the day to

record their blood glucose results in their logbook as well as

for historical purposes," she says. "Some meters offer the

option of averaging data for seven, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days, as

well as the ability to flag results with comments, categorize

pre- and post-meal test results and to download data to a home

or doctor's office computer system." McLaughlin says that

coding the meter is another consideration. Most meters require

a coding procedure to be done by the meter user. However, in

several meters, this is an automatic feature. (Coding

calibrates information gathered on a test strip to ensure an

accurate meter reading). "Research has shown, however, that the

accuracy of blood glucose results can vary by 10 percent to 43

percent if a meter has not been coded properly. Therefore, if a

person has trouble remembering to perform the coding procedure,

this may be a consideration when choosing a meter," she says.




How much blood will you have to provide? Monitors require

different amounts of blood. The less blood that's involved in

each test, the easier it is for the patient, according to Yee.

"Why use more blood than you have to?"




How do you cut out-of-pocket costs? If you have to pay out of

your own pocket for a monitor, know that many companies offer

mail-in rebates and other incentives. "Where they make the

money is in the test strips ($1 per strip on average). They

might even give out the meters for free," Yee says. For that

reason, experts say it pays to be careful about the monitor you

select. You don't want to purchase an inexpensive monitor, only

to find out that test strips are more costly than they might be

with another monitor.




Did you know you can talk to a diabetes educator? Diabetes

educators are trained to educate people about monitors and to

help them manage their overall diabetes care. Some hospitals,

community centers and other organizations offer their services

for free or on a sliding scale. Educators also can point you to

local resources if you're having trouble paying for your meter

or supplies. Some offer free monitors.


The good news for people with diabetes is that

glucose-monitoring technology is evolving with the launch of

smaller and faster monitors that collect more data and require

less blood. "[Glucose monitors] used to be the size of a tape

recorder, and it took a lot more blood and a couple of minutes

[to get a reading]. Now, they're the size of a car alarm on

your key ring - and the quickest ones [take] five seconds, and

the smallest amount of blood is 0.3 microliter versus a good 10

microliters for the old-fashioned monitors," Yee says.



McLaughlin says that continuous glucose-monitoring systems are

an exciting advance for the future. "They are the next step

toward a 'closed-loop system,' where a monitor reads the blood

glucose and transfers the information to an insulin pump that

delivers just the right amount of insulin - thereby, managing

the blood glucose more precisely. This technology is

anticipated to greatly improve the quality of life for people

with diabetes."





Reviewed by Val Jones, M.D.



From reader's digest.com


We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Diabetic Snacker Vegan Diet Good for Type 2 Diabetes Eat Your Veggies

Vegan Diet Good for Type 2 Diabetes

Vegan Diet Beats ADA-Recommended Diet in Lowering Heart Disease



Risk
By Caroline Wilbert

WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Elizabeth Klodas, MD, FACCOct. 1,




2008 -- A vegan diet may do a better job of reducing

cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients than a diet

recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA),

according to a new study.




Two out of three people with diabetes die of a heart attack or

stroke, so reducing cardiovascular disease is a priority. The

study was in part funded by the Physicians Committee for

Responsible Medicine, which promotes a vegan diet.





Health Check: Is Your Diabetes Under Control?
10 Common Foot Problems
Related to diabetes diabetes symptoms, hypoglycemia, type 2

diabetes, gestational diabetes, diabetes diet, type 1 diabetes,

low blood sugar , glucose, insulin resistance, diabetic

neuropathy, A1c, exercise and diabetes
© 2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.



For 22 weeks, participants followed either a low-fat,

low-glycemic vegan diet or guidelines prescribed by the ADA.

All 99 participants had type 2 diabetes. Both men and women

participated and were recruited through a newspaper ad in the

Washington, D.C., area.



Participants reported what they ate at the start of the trial

and throughout the trial. Researchers took the data and

calculated scores based on the Alternate Healthy Eating Index

(AHEI). Scores were calculated at the beginning of the 22 weeks

and again at the end. There was no difference in the scores

between the two groups at the start of the study.



Past research has shown a correlation between AHEI and

cardiovascular disease. The AHEI is a nine-component dietary

index used to rate foods and macronutrients related to chronic

disease risk. The higher the AHEI score, the lower the risk of

cardiovascular disease. The vegan dieters saw significant

improvements in their AHEI scores; the ADA group did not.



The vegan group improved significantly in every AHEI category,

including increased intake of vegetables, fruits, nut and soy

protein, and cereal fiber, and a decrease in trans fat intake.

Both groups were able to reduce their weight and their

hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood sugar levels over a

prolonged period of time. However, the vegan group experienced

more significant reductions in both categories.



"The results of this study suggest that, if followed for the

long-term, a low-fat vegan diet may be associated with a

reduced risk of major chronic diseases, particularly

cardiovascular disease," the study concludes.



Neither diet resulted in adequate intake of vitamins D or E, or

of calcium. Patients attempting to follow either eating plan

should consult with their doctor and make sure they are getting

adequate amounts of these nutrients.






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We welcome your comments or tips and of course your recipes.

Diabetic Recipes

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